I found this...I wanted to share.

Feel free to add, agree, or disagree with any of the points or opinion:

1. Listen for extra details. Don't assume you/we know all about aliens.

2. Don't appoint yourself a representative of humankind. Seven billion people here expect you to respect the global responsibility. Don't make yourself look ridiculous by saying you're an ambassador. You can't possibly be—unless named by an elected representative global assembly.

3. Don't offer information that can be used to (possibly criminally) manipulate humankind. Don't prime aliens on strategies for easy ways to "handle" humans. Some aliens, i.e. so called "gray" related colonizers, have been known to ask about just that. If you do inform them that way, other neighboring aliens and humans will cite you for naively violating your own people.

4. Remember, and be sure to remind aliens that humans are in the process of a fast burst of change, so it takes time for new, alien-related ideas to sink in. Remember how long it took you to feel comfortable with how aliens think and behave?

5. Always think and act as though the interaction includes other humans. Otherwise, you may stray unwittingly or the aliens may try to inflate your ego, thus making easy, stupid play of you. Please, report what you learn to other humans---allow their inputs and critiques in order to better test and refine your observations.

6. Get rid of all violent or misplaced metaphor in your communications with aliens (and in mind communications with humans). That makes for a much greater, more agreeable and trusting community (more individuals interacting with common purpose).

7. Remember that alien mind and technology looks at and perceives the whole cloud of your thinking, not just a linear string of words you emphasize. If you can, try to arrange your thoughts so that there are different, increasingly more subtle envelopes, or clouds of considerations surrounding any thought. Aliens can be expected to have mastered the ability to communicate those secondary and/or tertiary thought clouds effectively (which is probably an easier way to think, not harder).

8. Given their larger experience, expect aliens to subtly try to frame the context of the interaction. They may try to give you hints or indirectly steer your inquiry. Know when they go coldly silent for fear of saying too much---those moments are indicators of how their approach to humankind is structured.

9. Don't expect aliens to answer your every question or fill your every cup. Don't ask for material reward, which would contaminate both your and their thinking.

10. Be careful to watch for and report on any manipulative behaviors (by definition neurotic) or resource motivations among any aliens. Imagine what your human peers will think if you're perceived to be helping an alien colonizer.

11. Look and listen for indications of further, either monitoring or sub-networked aliens (other populations) either listening to, or possibly orchestrating the doings of the alien(s) you interact with. Older, more evolved populations may be bundled into it.

12. Keep in mind the fact that over time, aliens can be expected to have moderated or have genetically altered the intensity of their emotions in order to better work together. So, any gushes of, or strong emotions on your part may be seen as unusual, or, in some cases, even primitive, by aliens. Expect to see/perceive subdued, relatively dry emotions among aliens (as though the volume were simply turned down one half or less).

13. Expect to encounter aliens who value the collective social identity over individual identity. Group mind interactions will have cultivated this for long periods of their histories.

14. Finally, be aware that, due to intricate long-distance networks of interactions, aliens probably think of "civilization" as a greater cosmic complexity, rather than framing it in terms of one population or another. However, on the other hand, don't fall for aliens who tell you that they officially represent that entire, universal civilization. Look for counter-posed checks and balances between alien populations, a hoped-for (yet not always realized) universal equivalency, overall.

15. Above all else, do not abandon all critique when interacting with aliens. Instead, work to transcribe and refine your critique. Keep it alive.