One aspect of the now defunct SPP or Security & Prosperity Partnership, which may simply have gone underground for now and may emerge at a later time with a different name, are "multimodal corridors" which would have (or will) included a corridor for utilities and water pipelines. These are massive corridors that require huge swaths of land, owned by the citizens of this country, and extends from the Gulf of Mexico up the easter border of Texas, through Mississippi, Indiana and into Michigan. There are currently town meetings being held throughout these states discussing this massive land-grab.

From what I am reading, this is the reason that Agenda 21 is in the works. By herding U.S. citizens into stacked and compacted inner cities, corporations and international business interests can have their way with our country.

Trans Texas Corridor racing ahead
March 22, 2010

One of the proven ways Texans can STOP the TTC dead in its tracks is to utilize this little known goldmine of a government-to-government commission to force TxDOT to comply with the will of Texans within its jurisdiction.

The TTC-69 (planned to go from the Rio Grande Valley northeast to Texarkana and eventually up through Michigan) public private partnership (called CDA in Texas) was awarded to ACS of Spain and Zachry of San Antonio in June of 2008.

When TxDOT announced that TTC-35 was "dead," it also clearly stated TTC-69, also given the name I-69 to make it appear more harmless, is still moving forward. In fact, expansion of US 77 is already underway in the valley as part of the initial leg of what will be known as TTC-69/I-69.

In addition, Ports to Plains (to run from Mexico all the way to Alberta, Canada) and La Entrada de Pacifico, two other active TTC corridors, show that nothing has changed there either, except shedding the official connection by name to the Trans Texas Corridor. La Entrada, to traverse through the Big Bend area, has a disturbing new twist with the resurrection of the idea to cede Big Bend to international interests by deeming it an "international" park, essentially to join it with Mexico's "Big Bend" on the other side of the U.S. border.
'Nightmare' federal plan resurrected from crypt
Controversial project now promoted under new name

November, 2010

It was Amadeo Saenz, the executive director of the Texas Department of Transportation, who not quite two years ago, proclaimed to the Dallas News, "Make no mistake: The Trans-Texas Corridor, as we have known it, no longer exists."

But it's been exhumed, now appearing on numerous government and industry alliance websites as the new and separate projects that are known as the I-35 Corridor and the I-69 Corridor.

Moreover, the Texas agency appears to have made a strategic decision to begin first with the I-69 Corridor portion that had received less attention during the battle that raged over the mega-highway project called the Trans-Texas Corridor from 2006 to 2008 when George W. Bush was president.

That the U.S. Department of Transportation under the Obama administration continues to harbor the dream of Mexico-to-Canada NAFTA superhighways is made clear by the Federal Highway Administration website that proclaims the "Corridor: Interstate 69 (I-69)