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Thread: Buffy St.Marie

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    Buffy ST Marie - Universal Soldier

    here is a song that might be familiar to you -

    Universal Soldier



    Buffy St Marie wrote this song. In this
    clip she talks about what inspired her
    to write the lyrics and sings the song
    at the end




    Lyrics

    he's 5'2 and he's 6'4,
    he fights with missiles and with spears.
    he's all of 31 and he's only 17,
    he's been a soldier for a thousand years.

    he's a catholic, a hindu, an athiest, a jain,
    a buddhist and a baptist and a jew
    and he knows he shouldnt kill
    and he knows he always will kill
    you for me, my friend and me, for you

    and he's fighting for canada,
    he's fighting for france,
    he's fighting for the USA
    and he's fighting for the russians
    and he's fighting for japan,
    and he thinks we'll put an end to war this way.

    and he's fighting for democracy
    and fighting for the reds,
    he says it's for the peace of all.
    he's the one who must decide
    who's to live and who's to die,
    and he never sees the writing on the wall.

    But without him, how would Hitler
    Have condemned him, at Dachau?
    Without him Cesar would have stood alone,
    He's the one, who gives his body
    As a weapon of the war,
    And without him always killing cant go on.

    he's the universal soldier
    and he really is to blame,
    his orders come from far away no more.
    they come from him
    and you and me
    and brothers, cant you see?
    this is not the way we put an end to war



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    Re: Buffy ST Marie - Universal Soldier

    Great post! I wish that everyone could see and understand this. If only we could get the all the soldiers of the world to understand this. War is not the answer. I remember David Icke talking about this. I had no idea who was the author of the poem or song.

    Thank you
    "All that is necessary for the triumph of evil is that good men do nothing." (Edmund Burke)

    "There are a thousand hacking at the branches of evil to one who is striking at the root." (Henry David Thoreau)

    "Belief is Not Truth, and Truth is Never a Belief
    " (The Tantra Vision, Vol 2 Chapter #3 Chapter title: Breaking the four Seals)

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    Buffy St Marie - Star Walker

    Buffy Sainte Marie's ''Starwalker''






    Lyrics

    Starwalker, he's a friend of mine
    You've seen him looking fine
    He's a straight talker, he's a Starwalker
    Don't drink no wine
    Ay way hey o heya

    Wolf Rider she's a friend of yours
    You've seen her opening doors,
    She's a history turner, she's a sweetgrass burner
    And a dog soldier
    Ay hey way hey way heya

    Holy light, guard the night.
    Pray up your medicine song.
    Oh, stake dealer you're a spirit healer,
    Keep going on.
    Ay hey way hey way heya

    Lightning Woman, Thunderchild
    Star soldiers one and all oh
    Sisters, Brothers all together
    Aim straight, Stand tall

    Starwalker he's a friend of mine
    You've seen him looking fine
    He's a straight talker, he's a Starwalker
    Don't drink no wine
    Ah way hey o hey...

    Aya hey hey heyo way hey heyo
    Ay hey hey heya
    Hey way hey way heya
    Heya wey yoh
    Ay hey way hey way heya







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    Re: Buffy St Marie - Star Walker

    Buffy St. Marie







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    Re: Buffy ST Marie - Universal Soldier

    now that is synchronicity in action...lol...I had just finished listening to David Icke mentioning her song and he had memorized the lyrics to share with everyone ...I thought...I have to post her song on the forum here!

    Those words go right to our spirit!

    here is a little tidbit about when she wrote this song. She was living in Hawaii at the time and had made the album with the song Universal Soldier, and although there were many thousands of orders that had been filled by her company...not one record store got the records. She said that this action put her out of business. Like you and I felt about this song, so many many people did too. This song may have put the war makers out of business, its so strong.

    She wrote another famous song about love and will post it too as its lyrics and message go with Universal Soldier in a beautiful way...

    She is really gifted and comes from the Sask. reserves here in Canada

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    Buffy St. Marie - Up Where We Belong

    most people remember this song from
    Joe Cocker and Jennifer Warnes
    (Officer and a Gentleman)
    few knew it was Buffy St Marie
    who wrote the song.



    UP WHERE WE BELONG Lyrics



    Who knows what tomorrow brings
    In a world, few hearts survive
    All I know, is the way I feel
    When it�s real, I keep my pray alive

    The road is long
    There are mountains in our way
    But we climb steps every day

    Love lift us up where we belong
    Where the eagles cry, on a mountain high
    Love lift us up where we belong
    Far from the world we know
    Up where the clear winds blow

    Some hang on to "used-to-be"
    Live their lives locking behind
    All we have is here and now
    All our lives, out there to find

    The road is long
    There are mountains in our way
    But we climb steps every day

    Love lift us up where we belong
    Where the eagles cry, on a mountain high
    Love lift us up where we belong
    Far from the world we know
    Up where the clear winds blow

    Time goes by
    No time to cry
    Life�s you and I, alive, baby

    Love lift us up where we belong
    Where the eagles cry, on a mountain high
    Love lift us up where we belong
    Far from the world we know
    Up where the clear winds blow

    Love lift us up where we belong
    Where the eagles cry, on a mountain high
    Love lift us up where we belong
    Far from the world we know
    Up where the clear winds blow



    here is clip of Buffy singing "Up Where We Belong:


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    Re: Buffy ST Marie - Universal Soldier


    While looking for something else I came across a clip
    of Buffy singing Universal Soldier to the soldiers and
    they loved it!

    She such an inspiration for so many ...
    very gifted and sharing lady..




    here's the info
    Buffy Sainte-Marie performs for Veterans for Peace
    and Iraq Veterans against the war in front of the
    Capital and Native American Museum in
    Washington DC on the five year anniversary
    of the invasion of Iraq.


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    Smile Buffy St Marie - Bio






    A major singer-songwriter of the 1960s and the creator of several of that decade's best-known and most incisive protest anthems, Buffy Sainte-Marie (born c. 1941) remains one of just a few Native Americans to have attained international popularity in the field of popular music.


    Sainte-Marie's influence on the 1960s music scene has sometimes been underestimated, for several of her best songs became familiar in versions by other artists. Her antiwar song "The Universal Soldier," for example, became a hit for the Scottish folk singer Donovan. Sainte-Marie was an independent, eclectic musician; even if she was generally categorized under the folk label, she ventured into and rock, and in the 1990s she became an early adopter of the personal computer and its potential uses in musical expression. Tying most of Sainte-Marie's activities together has been her ongoing concern with Native American rights and with presenting an accurate picture of Native American culture to the rest of the world.


    Adopted by Massachusetts Family

    A member of the Cree Indian tribe, Sainte-Marie was born on a reservation in Qu'Appelle Valley, Saskatchewan, Canada. The year of her birth has been variously given as 1941 and 1942. Orphaned as a baby, she was adopted by a Massachusetts family named Sainte-Marie that was partially of Mi'kmaq Native American descent. As a child, though, Sainte-Marie knew little of her own Native background, and her rediscovery of that background later on became an important stimulus for her creative activity. Given the name Beverly Sainte-Marie and nicknamed Buffy, she was later ceremonially adopted by a Cree family related to one of her birth parents. Sainte-Marie lived for much of her life in the United States, becoming a dual U.S. and Canadian citizen, but she told an Ottawa Citizen interviewer in 1993 that she would always identify herself as Canadian.


    Sainte-Marie had some piano lessons as a child and also enjoyed writing poetry. She learned the guitar in her teens, and during family vacations in Maine she began writing songs. The timing was good, for when Sainte-Marie began attending the University of Massachusetts at Amherst, coffeehouses with live folk music entertainment were beginning to flower across New England. Sainte-Marie was a coffeehouse favorite as a college student, but she did not neglect her studies, either; she graduated in 1962 with a degree in Eastern philosophy and was recognized as one of the top ten students in her class. She later received a fine arts Ph.D. from the same institution.


    After she finished college, Sainte-Marie headed for the Greenwich Village neighborhood of Lower Manhattan in New York City, a mecca at the time for aspiring folk singers. With her unique outlook - virtually no other songwriters dealt with Native American life at the time - and her distinctively edgy vocal vibrato, Sainte-Marie won attention from the start in clubs such as the Gaslight Cafe and Gerdes Folk City. She toured and maintained her Canadian ties, writing "The Universal Soldier" during an appearance one night at Toronto's Purple Onion coffeehouse.


    Executives at the folk-oriented label Vanguard signed Sainte-Marie to a contract and released her debut album, It's My Way! in 1964. William Ruhlmann of the All Music Guide website called it "one of the most scathing topical folk albums ever made;" its subject matter ranged from incest to drug addiction ("Cod'ine," based on Sainte-Marie's own experiences in the aftermath of a serious bout with bronchial pneumonia in 1963, was later covered by several rock bands), and it included "The Universal Soldier" and another of Sainte-Marie's trademark songs, "Now That the Buffalo's Gone." Sainte-Marie's second album, Many a Mile (1965) mixed traditional songs with Sainte-Marie originals such as "Until It's Time for You to Go." That song was never well known in Sainte-Marie's own version, but it was covered by a long list of musicians that included Elvis Presley, Cher, Neil Diamond, Barbra Streisand, British icon Vera Lynn, and jazz vocalist Carmen McRae. Presley's version became a major hit in Europe in 1972 and helped put Sainte-Marie on a firm financial footing.


    Traveled to Nashville to Record

    Sainte-Marie's next two albums, Little Wheel Spin and Spin (1966) and Fire & Fleet & Candlelight (1967, with orchestral arrangements by classical-music satirist Peter Schickele), continued to draw attention, and she appeared at major venues such as New York's Carnegie Hall. Having always enjoyed country music, Sainte-Marie recorded in Nashville with country studio musicians for her 1968 album I'm Gonna Be a Country Girl Again. At the time, bands such as the Byrds had experimented with country-folk and country-rock fusions, but folk icon Bob Dylan's well-publicized Nashville sessions (and Nashville Skyline album) were still at least a year in the future. The album included "Soulful Shade of Blue" and "Sometimes When I Get to Thinkin'," two of Sainte-Marie's most characteristic love songs - a category for which she was known just as much as for her protest songs in the 1960s. Country star Bobby Bare enjoyed a hit with Sainte-Marie's country composition "The Piney Wood Hills," originally recorded on Many a Mile.


    Appearing on such mainstream media outlets as the Tonight Show with Johnny Carson, Sainte-Marie was, if not a star, at least one of the best-known folk musicians in the country. Her songs were often heard on the radio up to that point, but they disappeared as her criticism of the Vietnam War sharpened. According to Sainte-Marie's website, she was blacklisted because her name appeared on a White House list of performers "who deserved to be suppressed." Nevertheless, Sainte-Marie continued to record for Vanguard. Her albums from the end of the 1960s and the early 1970s were an adventurous group; Illuminations (1969) employed the psychedelic rock styles of the time and gave advance notice of Sainte-Marie's interest in musical electronics. The 1972 album Moonshot was mostly a straight-ahead rock effort except for the country-oriented "He's an Indian Cowboy in the Rodeo." That song was one of a group that gained Sainte-Marie a strong fan base among Native Americans, one which persisted even when she fell out of view in the pop mainstream.


    Albums such as She Used to Wanna Be a Ballerina (1971) and Native North American Child (1973) continued to feature unusual new Sainte-Marie compositions; the title track of the former album put Sainte-Marie back on the pop charts, while that of the latter was a satirical piece pointing to the invisibility of Native Americans in the mass media: "Sing about your ebony African queen/Sing about your lily-white Lili Marleen/Beauty by the dozen, but the girl of the hour/Is your Native North American prairie flower." Sainte-Marie moved to the MCA label in 1974 and issued the experimental Mongrel Pup the following year, with cryptic lyrics like "Laughter is the grease of growth/Support your local clown."


    Sainte-Marie moved to Hawaii in the late 1960s and continued to make her home there despite frequent projects that took her back to the mainland. A marriage to surfing instructor Dewain Bugbee ended in 1972. Sainte-Marie married actor Sheldon Peters Wolfchild in 1975, and they had a son, Dakota Starblanket Wolfchild. In 1976 Sainte-Marie withdrew from the recording scene in order to concentrate on raising a family, but she did not remain outside the creative sphere for long.


    Won Academy Award

    Appearing with her son, Sainte-Marie joined the cast of the long-running children's television program Sesame Street. She appeared on the show between 1976 and 1981. In a way Sesame Street launched the second phase of her career, which was increasingly often concerned with Native American issues. She used the show to introduce children to aspects of Native American life that she felt were poorly served by existing educational materials. Sainte-Marie continued to write songs, and "Up Where We Belong," co-written with Will Jennings and veteran producer Jack Nitzsche, was recorded by Joe Cocker and Jennifer Warnes and used in the 1982 film "An Officer and a Gentleman," bringing Sainte-Marie an Academy Award for Best Original Song. Some obituaries of Nitzsche reported that he and Sainte-Marie were briefly married in the early 1980s.


    Sainte-Marie's activities in the 1980s were varied. She appeared in several films, including Broken Rainbow (1985), about the long-running land dispute between the Hopi and Navajo tribes. She wrote about Native American issues for a variety of publications, and she penned a children's book, Nokomis and the Magic Hat, in 1986. The long effort to free imprisoned Native American activist Leonard Peltier listed Sainte-Marie as a stalwart supporter, and she taught courses at several institutions on a wide variety of subjects that included songwriting, musical electronics, and women's studies. She also appeared in a commercial for the Ben & Jerry's ice cream chain.


    One of Sainte-Marie's visiting professorships was at the Institute for American Indian Arts in Santa Fe, New Mexico, where she taught a course in digital technology and art. Perhaps unexpectedly for someone whose creative beginnings lay in the low-tech world of folk music, Sainte-Marie became an enthusiastic user of computers in both her visual-artistic and musical endeavors. Her digital art works, some of them as large as nine feet tall when realized in printed form, were exhibited in Canadian and American museums and galleries including the Glenbow Museum in Calgary, Alberta, and the G.O.C.A.I.A. Gallery in Tucson, Arizona.


    In 1992 Sainte-Marie returned to the recording arena, working from a home studio in Hawaii controlled by a Macintosh PowerBook computer. The album Coincidence and Likely Stories, released on the Chrysalis label, yielded a British hit in "The Big Ones Get Away." Sainte-Marie became an exponent of the idea that online communication could decentralize power in society generally and facilitate the spread of Native American culture specifically. "It does give an image of Stone Age to space age," she conceded to the London Independent. But she pointed out that Native Americans had been involved with computer technology almost since its inception. "It's natural for any indigenous community to be online, because of our desire to remain in the local community, yet be part of the global community," she pointed out.


    Sainte-Marie released Up Where We Belong, an album of remakes of her earlier hits, in 1996. The following year she was awarded the Order of Canada. Her educational efforts continued to expand; her Cradleboard Teaching Project, which included digital material, was a set of resources for educators who wanted to address deficiencies in the ways Native American history was usually taught - deficiencies that Sainte-Marie had encountered firsthand when she had looked at her own son's schoolbooks. "It was the same old dead text on dead Indians," she told USA Today. "It was shallow, inaccurate, and not interesting." Sainte-Marie also set up a foundation that supported Native Americans who wanted to attend law school. She continued to perform about 20 concerts annually, one of which was captured on her Live at Carnegie Hall album of 2004, and the sizes of the crowds she drew - a concert in Denmark, was estimated at over 200,000 people - testified to the lasting impact she had made on the musical world.




    source: Buffy Sainte-Marie: Biography from Answers.com
    Last edited by day; February 13th, 2010 at 10:59 PM.

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    Re: Buffy St Marie - Bio



    Buffy St. Marie



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    Buffy St.Marie

    From 1977. Buffy Sainte-Marie peforms her mouth bow version of "Cripple Creek", with a little help from Fred the Wonder Horse. Definitely not the sort of thing you'd see on the bland, watered down Sesame Street of today.




    From 1977, Buffy explains breastfeeding to Big Bird.


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