Facebook will integrate Skype video chat into its social networking service, striking a deal to cement its role as a hub for communications.

The agreement, announced by Facebook Chief Executive Mark Zuckerberg at the company's Palo Alto, California headquarters this morning (NZT), deepens its cooperation with Microsoft, which is in the process of acquiring Skype for US$8.5 billion (NZ$10.2b).

Zuckerberg said Facebook now has 750 million users. The new service, rolling out immediately, could be a huge boost for Skype, which currently has about 145 million regular users.

Facebook's move comes a week after Google Inc turned up the competitive heat by introducing a social networking service dubbed Google+.

While many of Google+'s social networking features are similar to those already available on Facebook, Google has attracted praise for its videoconferencing function, which allows up to 10 people on the service to participate in a video call.

Facebook's new offering, which initially is limited to one-to-one video chat, could benefit Microsoft, which is a small shareholder in Facebook and announced its purchase of Skype in May.

The world's largest software company is trying to muscle in on Google's turf with its Bing search engine, and is hoping Skype will help it broaden its portfolio of Web-based properties.

Skype, which was founded in 2003, allows people to make internet phone calls and video calls at no charge and has also developed premium services.

Microsoft buys Skype in May
Bilderberg meeting in June (Facebook and Microsoft in attendance)
Facebook buys Skype in July